Source Code Berlin’s Valentine is Free Software

Only one year is Source Code Berlin old and it has already fallen in love – with Free Software.

ilovefs-heart-small-enSeveral occasions manifested that love in 2015 and to keep the spark going. Thus we wanted to use this occasion – today’s International Day of Free Software – to recap why we fell in love with it last year.  

The year started off with meeting free culture enthusiast and Wikidata Project Manager Lydia Pintscher who got us hooked on Free Software with her passionate talk about how it can empower users. Free Software also went mainstream with companies picking up on the trend but Lydia noted that as commercial interest grows, the important aspects of Free Software that it cannot just be used but is rather an ongoing project of a community shall not be compromised by the new development as companies might only interested in the power of users as a side effect.

We also learned how others got hooked by Free Software. Kathleen Danielson shared with us her first experience with it as she was in university. She discovered new social networks which were “fascinating because they created different ways for people to interact with each other.” This together learning aspect helped her to meet friends who were already deeply involved in Free Software communities and would introduce her to different ideas about open source, free culture and why it is important. Ultimately it became important to her.

Then we met Jan Lenhardt from hood.ie, the web server for your app who believes in the open web which relies on Free Software heavily. Sam Muirhead then took this idea even further and introduced us to the idea of  an open source circular economy. In this context Free Software can be the starting point of an economy of open source. Major institutions are already bandwagoning on the idea and starting using Free Software, a good example being Munich.

Thus the future looks bright for Free Software. We are looking forward to meet more Free Software folks this year. Thank you to all the contributors and keep the spark going!

Listen back to the episodes:

Beyond Poor and Sexy Berlin with Lydia Pintscher

Gender, Community and Identity in Open Source with Kathleen Danielson

Databases, Javascript, and Society: Unlikely Heroes and Personal Convictions with Jan Lehnardt

Sam Muirhead on Video, Clothing and Circular Economics with Sam Muirhead

Podlove: Taking Podcasts Into a New Era

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro
@Metaebene Studios in Berlin
Host
avatar Tim Pritlove
@Metaebene Studios in Berlin
Guest

podscbPodcasting has existed now for close to 12 years, and in that short time we’ve seen success stories, waves of popularity, beloved programs that come to an end, and all kinds of attempts to move the medium forward. Of all the initiatives ever to be brought to podcasting, today’s guest spearheaded one of the most revolutionary from his personal media recording studio in Berlin. The initiative is known as Podlove, the person is named Tim Pritlove, and perhaps most importantly, today on the program he and I discuss how the project was born and has matured, looking at its present, future and its lasting impact on podcasting throughout the world.

Audio from Podcasts/Events:

Writing easy to maintain code – a talk by Jeroen De Dauw

A talk by Wikimedia’s very own developer and Software Craftmanship advocate Jeroen De Dauw about how to maintain code.
A significant amount of time is spend on reading code, sometimes more than on writing code. Jeroen asks questions like how does elegant code tend to rot over time, and what can developers do to prevent that? In this short talk, a series of common pitfalls and ways to avoid them will be outlined. Specific tipps show how you can apply the useful ideas for maintaining code right away.

You can find more on Software Craftmanship on Jeroen’s website.

Tactical Tech: Info Activism, From Berlin to the World

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro Host
avatar Alistair Alexander Guest

The Tactical Technology Collective, aka Tactical Tech, has been at the forefront of training and promotion of tech tools for not only journalists but also rights advocates all over the planet for well over a decade.  How do they do it? What does their work include? Today on the program we have the voices that can help explain it all…

286754_300x300Coming up… a conversation with Allistair Alexander, director of publishing and production (fresh from the Paris Climate Talks), we will also hear from those who use the tools to spark change as part of TT’s Exposing The Invisible film series, Before all that, we begin today by listening to co-founders Marek Tuszynski and Stephanie Hankey, experts from their recent talk at the Elevate Festival in Graz entitled “The Politics of Data in Quantified Society”. Don’t be fooled by the title, this is a conversation that goes beyond the activists and the journalists, today’s program, at its core, comes back to you and me and the devices, apps, and services that we use everyday.

MissingNo., my favorite Pokémon, a talk by Igor Wiedler

The Pokémon series featured some spectacular glitches that can teach us a lot about programming, computers and distributed systems. Igor Wiedler enthusiastically talks how users can gain the opportunity to change outcomes by applying the act of programming as a subversive measure, when programs diverge in unexpected ways.  Breaking the rules can open up new worlds! Especially in the world of Pokemon. If you want to know how, then watch this talk.

Playful Commons: A License to Play

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro Host
avatar Sebastian Quack Guest

tumblr_nqd7jkeErQ1uu97tno1_500Today on the program we’re re-focusing on the idea of place and how places can be used – specifically as spaces for playing games and a legal framework to preserve that right. In a world, especially the urban world, where so many of our activities are subject to rules and penalties for violating rules… there is a group of people in Berlin and around the world, who are exploring and promoting the concept of finding ways to play in everyday life. Why play and how to play in the major cities of this world..? – We will get into that as well. With help from one of the pioneers of the playful commons concept…  Sebastian Quack.

Links:

Struggle with death or how I survived my Fitbit – a talk by Andrea Knabe

As a non-coder but very enthusiastic about technology, Andrea Knabe encourages non-programmers to start coding. She talks about her very inspiring action of re-programming Fitbit (fitness tracker app) to modify it according to her needs. Fitness trackers are focused on weight loss and encourage to be more active. However, that is not always useful. When you are unable to eat, have no hunger and loss of appetite, the aim is not to lose weight but is not to die. Andrea shows how technology can work against you and what you can do to change that. Watch in this video how she changed the Fitbit app to work to her advantage

What to do with all this open data, a talk by Lucie-Aimée Kaffee

There is so much you can do with open data! Lucie Kaffee shows three totally different projects she worked on over the last months. Learn about:

“A Tree Of Life” build with the data of Wikidata”
“Markets-Berlin Project” based on data from Berlin Open Data”
“Phones Don’s Grow on Trees Project”

Lucie puts special emphasis on the different possibilities we have with open data, the different sources data can come from and the struggles and advantages is has when we use data from different sources.

Free Knowledge and Game Design

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro Host
avatar Thorsten S. Wiedemann Guest
avatar Carmen Guest
avatar Lucie Guest
avatar Helen Hahn Guest

Game_JamGame Jam: a concept that brings together game designers and game enthusiasts for anywhere between 24 and 72 hours with the purpose of planning, designing and creating a game. Since they started more than a decade ago, Game Jams have been going on regularly, all over the world often with specific themes.

Recently at Wikimedia Deutschland in Berlin, there was the Free Knowledge Game Jam; where participants were  challenged to create a game that makes use of publicly accessible free and open licensed data and/or tools. A concept with far reaching impact, not only for game makers but for society as a whole.
Today on the program, we’re walking around the Free Knowledge Game Jam learning about these talented participants and their unique projects.

Links:

 

Gamify Graphentheorie: The story of Wikigame by Yetzt

How fast and efficient can you click through the Wikipedia – from one article to another? Six degrees of Wikipedia was made into a game for re:publica, Europe’s conference about internet and society. Watch this and find out about all the secrets. Also enjoy how our participants try to get from the article about “Sexualpraktiken” to “Hillary Swank”. The Wikigame is on!

Find out more:

re:publica 2015 – Six degrees of Wikipedia 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=taaR3lNZ3Rs

https://re-publica.de/session/six-degrees-wikipedia-0

Yetzt on Github

https://github.com/yetzt/wikigame-js

Source Code Berlin looks into creativity and innovation in fields related to open source technology in Berlin in form of bi-weekly podcast, events and tech videos.