Tag Archives: berlin

Rachel Uwa: Learning via Machines, Making and Make-Believe

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro Host
avatar Rachel Uwa Guest

(Episode 43) As we approach the end of 2016, for many people, it will be remembered as a year of painful world events and some shocking realizations about how little we understand about one another. It isn’t that feeling disconnected or mass violence were invented over the past year, but it is perhaps a major moment in recent history where we are confronted with the depth and scale that these things can reach.

screen-shot-2016-12-15-at-16-24-10With this as the backdrop, in communities all over the world – like Berlin – there are projects dedicated to learning, new experiences, and connecting people. One such project is the School of Machines, Making and Make-Believe. In 2015 we first heard from Rachel Uwa, founder of the School of MA, about what the plan and mission was and how it would all work. Almost two years later, today on the podcast we hear from Rachel, about the ups, downs, and interesting developments at the school. We also delve into the art of trying something new, learning from failure, and philosophy of growth.

If you’re curious about human behavior, learning, technology, community, or anything in between — this is the podcast for you.

Ladies That FOSS

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro Host
avatar Julia Schuetze Guest
avatar Michael Henretti Guest

(Episode 41) On the last Sunday of October 2016 a group of curious and inspired people got together at Wikimedia Deutschland in Berlin for Ladies That FOSS; an open source hack event aimed primarily at women who want to join a free and open source software (FOSS) project but don’t know where to start.  Source Code Berlin was there to listen and observe, a unique experience that we’re excited to share with you in podcast form. So sit back, press play, and listen to  participants talking about what they’re passionate about in the world of software and programming as well as their experience and wishes when it comes to the gender gap in the tech industry.

screenshot-2016-11-03-14-06-43Relavant Link:

Source Code Berlin’s Valentine is Free Software

Only one year is Source Code Berlin old and it has already fallen in love – with Free Software.

ilovefs-heart-small-enSeveral occasions manifested that love in 2015 and to keep the spark going. Thus we wanted to use this occasion – today’s International Day of Free Software – to recap why we fell in love with it last year.  

The year started off with meeting free culture enthusiast and Wikidata Project Manager Lydia Pintscher who got us hooked on Free Software with her passionate talk about how it can empower users. Free Software also went mainstream with companies picking up on the trend but Lydia noted that as commercial interest grows, the important aspects of Free Software that it cannot just be used but is rather an ongoing project of a community shall not be compromised by the new development as companies might only interested in the power of users as a side effect.

We also learned how others got hooked by Free Software. Kathleen Danielson shared with us her first experience with it as she was in university. She discovered new social networks which were “fascinating because they created different ways for people to interact with each other.” This together learning aspect helped her to meet friends who were already deeply involved in Free Software communities and would introduce her to different ideas about open source, free culture and why it is important. Ultimately it became important to her.

Then we met Jan Lenhardt from hood.ie, the web server for your app who believes in the open web which relies on Free Software heavily. Sam Muirhead then took this idea even further and introduced us to the idea of  an open source circular economy. In this context Free Software can be the starting point of an economy of open source. Major institutions are already bandwagoning on the idea and starting using Free Software, a good example being Munich.

Thus the future looks bright for Free Software. We are looking forward to meet more Free Software folks this year. Thank you to all the contributors and keep the spark going!

Listen back to the episodes:

Beyond Poor and Sexy Berlin with Lydia Pintscher

Gender, Community and Identity in Open Source with Kathleen Danielson

Databases, Javascript, and Society: Unlikely Heroes and Personal Convictions with Jan Lehnardt

Sam Muirhead on Video, Clothing and Circular Economics with Sam Muirhead

Podlove: Taking Podcasts Into a New Era

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro
@Metaebene Studios in Berlin
Host
avatar Tim Pritlove
@Metaebene Studios in Berlin
Guest

podscbPodcasting has existed now for close to 12 years, and in that short time we’ve seen success stories, waves of popularity, beloved programs that come to an end, and all kinds of attempts to move the medium forward. Of all the initiatives ever to be brought to podcasting, today’s guest spearheaded one of the most revolutionary from his personal media recording studio in Berlin. The initiative is known as Podlove, the person is named Tim Pritlove, and perhaps most importantly, today on the program he and I discuss how the project was born and has matured, looking at its present, future and its lasting impact on podcasting throughout the world.

Audio from Podcasts/Events:

Building Tools for Refugees

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro Host
avatar Khaled Guest
avatar Katharina Dermühl Guest
avatar Markus Neuschäfer Guest
avatar Yolanda Schmidtke Guest

Over the past few months the story and struggle of people trying to make it to Germany, Austria, and neighboring countries has made headlines. They’re referred to as refugees, though at the latest hackathon in Berlin one participant remarked, “I’d rather be called a newcomer.”

The number one tool of the newcomer? — The mobile phone. The number one demand throughout the journey? – Power to charge them, wifi to transmit messages to concerned loved ones, for checking the map for other routes that offer safer passage, and possibly to communicate with those who might be waiting for them once they get to their destinations. But the phone and internet alone are not enough. To manage to get through the hardship of getting from Syria or Libya or Iraq or Afghanistan to the areas of Europe that welcome them.. the barriers are still many. The beast of bureaucracy that would drive even the most fluent German speaker mad, the landlord who won’t rent to “refugees”, the prestigious University that doesn’t recognize credits from some of Syria’s finest institutions. What can be done to overcome such barriers? Who is stepping up to help and how are they doing it?

cropped-RainbowHeart_SoloToday on the podcast, we talk about tools for refugees, or as I’ll refer to them from now on in this program: newcomers.. recent arrivals.. those who are trying to start a life in a new place. What tools are they using and who is developing these tools. Specifically in the Berlin area, where hundreds if not thousands of volunteers are busy in so many ways, helping people arrive and get settled. They, like many of us, are learning as they go, and today we’re going to hear about what they’ve learned, what they’re creating, and how it is making a difference in this unprecedented moment in history.

Links:

Apps for Navigating Berlin

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro Host
avatar Andreas Schildbach Guest
avatar Torsten Grote Guest

In a city like Berlin, there are of course specific apps that people like to use in their daily lives to help find information and learn things. Today on the program we’re looking at essential Berlin apps, with a focus on the ones that help you get around, with help from two developers who are very much pioneers in that world, Andreas Schildbach and Torsten Grote. This was also the week where we asked you the listeners about your app choices for Berlin life, and we will hear what some had to say. Its the Berlin transport apps episode.. take a listen.

8282626818_89d4d13e2a_qList of Apps/Tools mentioned on today’s program:

Album Art by Sivi Steys / Flickr CC-BY-SA 2.0

C-Base: 20 Years of Inspiring the World

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro Host
avatar Macro Guest
avatar Suskie Guest
avatar Woodworker Guest
avatar E-punc Guest
avatar Henri Bergius Guest
avatar T Guest

This summer at Chaos Communication Camp 2015, one of the world’s first hacker spaces, C-Base, celebrated its 20th birthday and today on the program, that celebration continues. Join us as we introduce the space and hear from some of its crew as they recount their first experiences at C-base, what it means to them, and some wonderful or odd moments that they will never forget.

c-base-Logo-page-001Useful Links:

Upcoming event hosted by Mark Fonseca Rendeiro:

Live Podcast September 27th

The Curious and Creative Minds of EnthusiastiCon

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro Host

A few days ago EnthusiastiCon at Wikimedia Deutschland brought together a group of energetic and inspired individuals who love programming or are interested in programming at some level (from the most basic to wow my brain hurts so good right now). enthusiasticon-avatar1-300x300Together, over the course of two days, they presented what they love and explained why they love it. They inspired one another and there was plenty of laughing, learning and entertainment along the way. On today’s podcast we present to you some of the voices from EnthusiastiCon!

Going Up the Down Escalator: Paul Adams on Moving to Berlin

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro Host
avatar Paul Adams Guest

With each passing year thousands upon thousands of people from all over the world have moved their lives to Berlin in persuit of some goal or dream. The phenomenon is well known and often discussed, but the requirements of that move; the unexpected obstacles that people face in the persuit of that dream, that story is one you rarely hear about in detail. Today on the program we hear from Free Software Company Director and Community Manager Paul Adams, who’s the first to admit that there have been times where he had to run up the down escalator and overcome some very bizarre circumstances on the road to becoming a Berliner.
15532889489_960ea1ebeb_mLinks:

Databases, Javascript, and Society: Unlikely Heroes and Personal Convictions

avatar Mark Fonseca Rendeiro Host
avatar Jan Lehnardt Guest

In the world of databases and open source software there is more philosophy and social conciousness than one might imagine at first glance. Through his work as a public speaker and developer for couchdb and hood.ie, Jan Lehnardt has never made any secret about his goal to challenge the status quo and push things forward. When it comes to developing tools using principles such as independence, diversity, and mutual respect, Jan is a force to be reckoned with — and a voice worth listening to.

Relevant Links: